Controlled gout with allopurinol. So is jogging OK?

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This topic contains 38 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  GoutPal HelpDesk 1 year, 1 month ago.

Viewing 18 posts - 19 through 36 (of 39 total)
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  • #8315

    vegetarianGuy
    Participant

    zip2play said:

    Post edited 2:13 pm – April 16, 2010 by zip2play


    Thus the worst thing a goutie can do is sleep.Cool


    Yes I think I  noticed that recently Cool

    #9553

    gtaus
    Participant

    Newbie to this forum. I'm a 50 year old male trying to increase my activitiy to lose weight and trim up. I have been riding bike, but barely break a sweat after 40 minutes. Walking does not seem to help either. So I was looking for a more intense workout. Recently I started a walk/jog interval training. After one week, my knees were really sore. After a week and a half I started getting a gout attack in my right ankle. Now it's just painful to walk and my exercise program is in a setback. I don't think my body is able to handle the impact of jogging anymore.

    Given my age and gout condition, I'm thinking maybe my days of jogging are behind me. I still want a more intense workout than either walking or biking provide. After doing a little research on the internet, I found the Gazelle Edge trainer by Tony Little, which claims to give you the workout of jogging but without the impact. The user reviews on the machine are very positive. But I'm looking at it from the point of view of someone my age taking AP daily for gout. Does anybody here use the Gazelle Edge trainer, and if so, how does it affect your gout condition?

    As others have mentioned, I'd rather be outside jogging than working out like a hamster on a machine in the house, but in reality, I want to stay active without causing gout attacks and the impact of jogging has triggered my recent gout attack. Any advice appreciated.

    #9557

    trev
    Participant

    @ stay active without causing gout attacks …

    Try hill walking on a hot day with a group 20 years younger than you for low impact sweating!

    I did this last 2 w/e's on some difficult meds currently- maybe that didn't help and I am overweight.

    The point is -all the sleepiness and fluid retention, kidney hammering etc that meds cause seem to get one into a chair and die off, if not carefull !

    Something like this- too steep to farm, in the distance..

    [Swift Hill Nature Reserve. nr. Slad, Gloucs.] Lovely area..Laurie Lee country!

    #9558

    gtaus
    Participant

    Looks like a nice place to walk. I live in northern Minnesota and our country is basically flat. No hill climbing around here to speak of. Lots of nice pine trees, however. Also, I'm thinking ahead to my exercise routine in the winter months when walking outside is not much of an option. Winters here can be long. We have a local saying that we have winter followed by 3 months of poor ice skating.

    I have a manual treadmill and exercise bike at home. The treadmill gives me a good workout, but it's still too high impact. The exercise bike was useful when I first started exercising, but soon I was up to over 45 minutes on the bike and not breaking a sweat. I'm looking at stepping and ellipical trainers at the moment, which is why I wondered if anyone is using the Gazelle Edge trainer by Tony Little. If I can get a good workout like jogging, but without the impact, that would be good for me. Like I said, the user reviews on the Gazelle Edge trainer are very positive, but I'm concerned how it may affect my gout condition.

    In the meantime, while it's still walking weather, I think I'll start walking trails and back roads once I get over this latest gout attack. Maybe if I walk far enough I'll find a nice hill.

    #9559

    trev
    Participant

    Glaus- Sorry about the flat terrain- how's about carrying a weighted pack? Lots of joggers do this for training -and it beats being overweight Embarassed

    The other thing is , my exercise bike has a torsion tightener on it- Can you lean on that to get more sweatabilty?

    When I'm out on an old 3 gear Sturmey Archer bike it's hard work uphill for the same reason. Everything these days is TOO easy, even trying to suffer for our health Wink I've since loaned out the bike, too…Cool

    The other old standby for low impact is swimming.

    Some wag said sweat is the best Cardio medicine- and I'm not sure that gout doesn't have connections in this dept.

    [Arterial / veinous inflammations from SUA = High BP?   – & Hypertension [HT] is a known factor in gout]

    #9568

    gtaus
    Participant

    I have weighted vests and ankle packs, but I have not used them for years. At the moment, I'm just looking for low impact workouts because my joints cannot take the beating and my gout flared up from my jogging. Maybe the weights will be an option once I get over this gout attack.

    My exercise bike does have a torsion tigtener on it, but I've set it low on purpose to reduce the impact on my knees. I have also been riding my real bike outside and that is a better workout, but still, it's all lower body and I can ride for 45+ minutes and not break a sweat.

    I don't feel that I've had a good workout until I feel the sweat pouring down. When I first started jogging, I loved the workout and the sweat pumps were working overtime. It felt great. Unfortunately, after one week, my knees could no longer take the impact and a few days later I had a gout attack. I really wanted to get a good workout, but I don't want to end up in bed not being able to walk because of my gout. So I'll continue to explore other lower impact options.

    #9569

    trev
    Participant

    OK Glaus..2 more things: Do you use those shock absorbant insoles? This would also help with the weight impact -even if you kept to walking- I didn't really mean jog, right now.

    On that- what about speed walking? It looks strange but it must be hard to do as they all  look so darned wirey!

    You're probably relatively fit, compared to many- Maybe you'll have to forgo the 'burn' till you get your UA under control. Figures?

    #9570

    gtaus
    Participant

    I just bought 2 pair of Asics running shoes with gel insoles. I should have started running with them, but I bought them after about 4 days of jogging. By then, my knees where already getting sore. So the better running shoes with gel insoles may not have been enough at that point.

    My gout is getting better and I should be able to start exercise walking again in a few days. Maybe I'll just work more slowly into the jogging, or not at all. I'd rather be walking further than trying to jog and end up with another gout attack.

    I had not given much thought to speed walking. Maybe I could increase my exercise walking using things like those heavy hand weights. Also, I see some exercise stores selling poles for walking. They kind of look like cross country ski poles, which I have, so maybe that's another option. I was able to walk 2 miles (30 minutes) without breaking a sweat, which is why I started increasing my exercise with jogging intervals, but maybe my old body just cannot take the impact anymore. Perhaps a longer walk is the best solution for now.

    Having a gout attack is like a triple whammy. First, I miss my daily workouts, second, it's just painful to walk around the house, and third, my daily morning weights are climbing back up the scale. Well, I hope to be back exercise walking in a few days and maybe things will be better again.

    #9571

    trev
    Participant

    Yeah, Take it steady!

    People forget that gout takes years to establish and won't go overnight.

    What are your SUA figures- and have you started on AlloP ?

    #9572

    Hayata
    Participant

    Hello Friends,

    i used to jog all the time and would like to get back to it. I developed a nasty case of plantar fasciitis on my left foot with the gout in my right great toe. I think I got the problems on my left side by favoring it due to toe pain on the other foot. I am very active but years of foot pain has really bummed me out.

    #9573

    limpy
    Participant

    Hayata said:

    Hello Friends,

    i used to jog all the time and would like to get back to it. I developed a nasty case of plantar fasciitis on my left foot with the gout in my right great toe. I think I got the problems on my left side by favoring it due to toe pain on the other foot. I am very active but years of foot pain has really bummed me out.


    Hello Hayata, Are you on Allop? If so how long. I'm just wondering because your trouble sounds alot like mine. I just started Allop. in May and still having some pain. But also have pain in my foot that MD said may be plantar fascitiis. Thanks LIMPY

    #9574

    gtaus
    Participant

    trev said:…What are your SUA figures- and have you started on AlloP ?


    I have been taking AP for about 8 months. I had a really bad gout attack last winter and could not walk for almost 2-3 months. Until then, my gout attacks only lasted for maybe 3-4 days at most. Anyway, I went on AP after that bad spell with gout and had not had a flare up until I started jogging.

    Is there a test kit/tester for taking your SUA at home? I go into the doctor about every 3 months and they take blood. My levels, according to the doctor, have been back to normal with daily AP. But that was before my latest flare up due to jogging. Is there a simple way to check your SUA at home without having to draw blood?

    #9576

    trev
    Participant

    @ Glaus Q: Not had a flare up until I started jogging.

    Don't assume it was just the jogging. Lowering urate triggers old attack sites, if not new [to the owner] as well  for some months into treatment.

    I have a kit for SUA testing from Kernel manfr;. it works fine to 5%  [that's good enough] and can monitor progress every few days on [or off] meds and diets. More frequent testing is done by some- and if graphed, can show interesting trends, like VegGuy here.

    I personally think normal metabolic daily variations can obscure the meaning somewhat, & also unless your technique is A1 , tbh.

    AFAIK- blood sampling is the only ready way to get urate status. Urine and saliva strips test the outcome of over acidity but not the body load held in the blood. If it wasn't so subtle, gout would be better forseen/handled, no doubt!

    You really need to get actual figures on SUA- leaving Docs to 'mutter asides' gives too much hostage to fortune. 5mg/dl is thought OK. [~300umol – multiply mg X 60 is close enough]

    [Bear in mind 7 is considered within 'normal' range- for a NON gouty!]

    They don't all seem to understand the movement of urates [which is complex enough to the layman, true] and also don't like overprescribing AlloP or Colch either, as they are powerful drugs with serious side effects.

    I would say, ease off heavy joint (esp. shock) activity and let the  meds 'do their stuff ' for a few months and then get back slowly, next time. You were probably a bit over-enthusiastic whilst resetting your gout back to 'controlled' state [not 'cured' , btw] this last time.

    All the same you appear well on track -with a positive approach that's very necessary.

    #9577

    MyFootHurts
    Participant

    gtaus said:


    Is there a test kit/tester for taking your SUA at home? I go into the doctor about every 3 months and they take blood. My levels, according to the doctor, have been back to normal with daily AP. But that was before my latest flare up due to jogging. Is there a simple way to check your SUA at home without having to draw blood?


    There are UA tests available for home use, that I know of.

    They work like blood glucose monitors, if you've ever used one of those.  You prick your finger and apply a drop of blood to a test strip.

    #9580

    hansinnm
    Participant

    MyFootHurts said:

    Post edited 12:11 pm – August 8, 2010 by MyFootHurts


    …They work like bood glucose monitors, if you've ever used one of those.  You prick your finger and apply a drop of blood to a test strip.


    One more thing, if you want to save money: Make sure that you get a large blob of blood, approx. 1/8 inch (for Americans) and 3mm (for the rest of the world)  diameter or readings will come in low, meaning you wasted a test strip. And they are outragely expensive. Cry

    #9582

    zip2play
    Participant

    Anyway, I went on AP after that bad spell with gout and had not had a flare up until I started jogging.

    I would not be quick to dismiss jogging/running as innocuous, especially in the first year of treatment.

    Entertain this fact if you will:

    We have gout attacks and the body deals with them by walling off the urate with flesh, fat and scar tissue. Some of this urate peeks throrugh to the bloodstream and causes an immune response…pain and inflammation. Some is more successbully walled off and invisible to the immune system for years or decades unless something happens to change the status quo. To me it seems likely that a buried tophus in the ball of the foot, usually the bunion joint is banged pretty furiously with repeated hard footfalls in running. Such battering might readily disturb the covering of the tophus and WHAM the body attacks it again. Ultimately, the resolution might be for the good…but a full blown attack is a high price to pay. So me might ultimately have to choose whether to let sleeping dogs lie or to let them attack with fury. Food for thought?

    #9584

    gtaus
    Participant

    Thanks for all the advice and links on the home test kits. I'll be checking them out.

    I wondered if jogging would cause a gout flare up. I have read that reducing uric acid can cause gout attacks as well as increasing the uric acid level. But I also feel pain in my knees from the jogging, and I don't know if this is just a result of the impact of the jogging and/or a gout related condition. I have never had gout in my knees before, so I was assuming my sore knees were a result of the impact from jogging. At any rate, my gout flare up in my ankle is OK today (4 days later), but my knees are still sore (7 days).

    There is no way I want to get myself into a full blown gout attack like I suffered through last winter (2-3 months). I gained almost 30 pounds during that period because I was almost completely bed ridden. The doctor put me on a 2 week regieme of Prednisone, starting off with a very high dose and decreasing every 3 days. The Prednisone took away the pain almost immediately and allowed the Allop to combat the rest of the gout over the course of the two weeks. But the Prednisone made me sick – and hungry – and that also added to my weight problem.

    Since then, I've managed to lose 20 pounds through diet and exercise. I still have a long way to go to reach my target weight and that is why I was starting to jog. But this setback with the gout flare up has not helped and I have added a few pounds just this week alone.

    I'm still looking at getting an ellipitical trainer and some other exercise gear to help me workout with less impact. I have always felt the best workout was the simple method of pushups, situps, and jogging. But my gout, and age, has complicated my life and maybe it's just time I find a way to exercise without the impact caused by jogging. I don't want to be bedridden again in my pursuit to better health.

    I appreciate the help and advice you guys have offered. I have two younger brothers following in my footsteps with gout. So they both look to me for advice, which I really don't have much. So I'm glad I found this forum. Again, thanks.

    #9594

    zip2play
    Participant

    Just to address one point. Every timeI have tried jogging, all goes well for about 3 weeks and then my knees begin to ache. The pain lasts for several weeks after I stop jogging. I have almost no knee problems with using the elliiptical trainer though. I use the professional style Life-Styler that my gym has (about 30 of them.) I've tried the store-bought consumer models and they seem pretty crappy by comaprison…herky-jerky instead of smooth.

    Since I've ripped the cartilege in both knees (first one in high school during the Civil WarWink) I don't know whether I can attribute any of the pain to gout or just rotten knees, best guess is the latter.

Viewing 18 posts - 19 through 36 (of 39 total)

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